- By Edith Wharton Richard Gray Jonathan Franzen

Three Novels of New York: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence

  • Title: Three Novels of New York: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence
  • Author: Edith Wharton Richard Gray Jonathan Franzen
  • ISBN: 9780143106555
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Paperback
  • Three Novels of New York The House of Mirth The Custom of the Country The Age of Innocence For the th anniversary of Edith Wharton s birth her three greatest novels in a couture inspired deluxe edition featuring a new introduction by Jonathan Franzen Born into a distinguished New York fa

    For the 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton s birth her three greatest novels in a couture inspired deluxe edition featuring a new introduction by Jonathan Franzen.Born into a distinguished New York family, Edith Wharton chronicled the lives of the wealthy, the well born, and the nouveau riches in fiction that often hinges on the collision of personal passion and social coFor the 150th anniversary of Edith Wharton s birth her three greatest novels in a couture inspired deluxe edition featuring a new introduction by Jonathan Franzen.Born into a distinguished New York family, Edith Wharton chronicled the lives of the wealthy, the well born, and the nouveau riches in fiction that often hinges on the collision of personal passion and social convention This volume brings together her best loved novels, all set in New York.The House of Mirth is the story of Lily Bart, who needs a rich husband but refuses to marry without both love and money The Custom of the Country follows the marriages and affairs of Undine Spragg, who is as vain, spoiled, and selfish as she is irresistibly fascinating The Pulitzer Prize winning The Age of Innocence concerns the passionate bond that develops between the newly engaged Newland Archer and his finac e s cousin, the Countess Olenska, new to New York and newly divorced.For than sixty five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English speaking world With than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up to date translations by award winning translators.

    1 thought on “Three Novels of New York: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence

    1. What an amazing experience it was to read The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence back to back. One written early in Wharton's career and the other at the end. Wharton's writing is luminous and her perspicacious portrait of New York society in the Gilded Age is smart, intelligent, and incisive. We should all read more Wharton!30 June 2017 Re-reading again for my seminar in Toronto.

    2. I read the first book in this collection, "The House of Mirth." . . . . it was frustrating and depressing. I have not moved on to either of the others. I do love the old way of writing so I gave it three stars, but I found the inability of the characters to speak truthfully to each other, which would have made their lives soooo much easier in the first place, irritating! But then, I guess that was how it was in those days.

    3. All three of these books, especially The Age of Innocence, touch on the timeless hypocrisy of life and society. It amazes me how much hasn't changed since 1900

    4. Edith Wharton was perhaps the premier novelist of late nineteenth century New York high society.The heroine of the first novel in this collection - The House of Mirth - is a beautiful woman of good birth. These traits give her entree into the best houses, as well as the attention of numerous suitors. At the same time, her position is tenuous. Her parents are deceased and her financial resources slim. As a result, she must play her cards well to prosper, or even to survive.This she attempts to do [...]

    5. The Age of Innocence:Memorable and moving. A delightful and appropriate ending. A lovely and haunting read.The House of Mirth:Although it is a bit transparent, moralistic and histrionic, I love her descriptions of inner torment and it's rare to meet an omniscient narrator who has as much respect for her characters as Wharton. I loved this book. Her management of tension was superb and her characters carefully drawn. A delight.The Custom of the Country:Frustrating because of how well written the [...]

    6. America and Europe of the 1800s were stiff, gilded, formal place, full of "old" families, rigid customs and social transgressions.And nobody chronicled them better than Edith Wharton, who spun exquisitely barbed novels out of the social clashes of the late nineteenth century. "Three Novels of New York: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence" contains some of the best work she ever did, exploring the nature of infidelity, passion, social-climbing and a woman's place i [...]

    7. I just finished The Age of Innocence. I read The House of Mirth years ago and loved it, but hadn't read anything else by Wharton until now. I thought that this was a really humorous and interesting look at New York Society. It was rather different than the serious and sometimes upsetting story of The House of Mirth, but I quite enjoyed it. It did seem to drag a bit at the beginning until you began to differentiate the characters and recognize who was who. By far, the best part of the novel is th [...]

    8. I can' t find The Custom of the Country by itself here, but I just recently read it based on a New Yorker article about Edith Wharton. The arricle argued that the novel rivals The Great Gatsby as a commenraey on early 29th century America. I read The Age of Innocence within the last year and am currently re-reading House of Mirth.

    9. Sowhat can I say about Custom of the Country and The House of Mirth. Well, I the book (they were both in the same collection) across the room on more than one occasion. The characters make you crazy, but you can't stop reading. The Age of Innocence was also excellent. I think I threw that one only once.

    10. Except for The Custom of the Country, which was utterly inferior, I would give these volumes five stars. Lily Bart and Ellen Olenska are two of my favorite fictional characters (along with Anna Karenina and Becky Sharpe - could there be a pattern here?), and it's good to be reminded of how few options women had not too long ago.

    11. A trip to Edith Wharton's home in New England inspired me to read up, and the Three Novels of Old New York were classic tales of Wharton-era Manhattan: down-on-their-luck ladies, impetuous young men, unwanted pregnancies You know, stuff we don't have anymore in the 21st century.

    12. The Custom of the Country was relatively forgettable. Both The Age of Innocence and House of Mirth are wonderful reads. The movie adaptation of House of Mirth was a horrible train wreck, however.

    13. Read The Age of Innocence for book group. Rich descriptions, can see a lot of the author and her loveless marriage in the book. Did not really enjoy it.

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